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I went on to see Culture Shock’s infectious tunes get people moving at gigs all over the country including many of the Free Festivals that they were so keen to be part of even when there was usually little equipment, no money and plenty of police hassle on offer. Pretty soon their song Stonehenge became the one always demanded for encores regardless of whether it had already been played. Watching them play you could see that Dick had the energy and drive to sing and jump about all night as well as to illuminate the inevitable broken string gaps with witty tales and his trade mark very personal political banter or sometimes just weird whoop whoop noises! The others seemed content to leave him to it and concentrate on having a good time and playing as well as they could.

They played mostly in the anarcho punk scene and had to contend with many an ungrateful punk (such as myself) heckling them to play Subhumans classics till their last gig in 1989. Their music was though a welcome break to the dirge that was becoming fashionable within the punk scene as bands seemed to lose their drive to do something special but instead to sound as devastatingly noise-some as they could. Culture Shock gave everyone a chance to dance, prance and jump about in that speedy reggae-ish non-aggressive manner that meant the bruises from the macho punx could heal a bit and we could actually have fun. I remember one gig at the Bath Longacre Hall after a long day hunt sabbing when they played with Chumbawamba and Atavistic. The crowd for the most part tried to throw themselves about to the frantic pace of Atavistic or just gawped stupefied by the noise. Then they stood in awe as Chumba’s did their theatrical stage show and finally danced as madmen and women when Culture Shock took to the stage (it may have played in a different order).

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